Categories
Caffeine Insomnia Sleep Tiredness

Coffee, Does It Cause Insomnia?

Insomnia & Coffee, Not A Good Mix

Coffee fuels my insomnia!

Insomnia and sleep disorders in general are on the rise. Whilst many news outlets tend to focus on blaming the obesity epidemic, social media and stress, few if any fail to mention that stimulants may have a role in increasing this trend.

Insomnia is a complicated disease, so I won’t be giving a “do x to solve y” type of article!

The aim is to highlight the facts about Insomnia and practical steps you can take to avoid or reduce its effects on your health.

Insomnia Mixed With Coffee
Photo by Jon Tyson @jontyson on Unsplash

Insomnia

If you seek the advice of a qualified health professional they would typically proceed to ask questions about how long you have been suffering, ask about your lifestyle and daily habits as well as questions related to stress and anything that might have an emotional impact on you recently.

This is done to attempt to diagnose the type of insomnia that you may have. Although there are many sources that can cause insomnia, medical professionals classify insomnia in two categories.

Transient insomnias, also known as short term or acute insomnias, last between a few days and a few weeks. A lot of people suffer short term insomnia whilst experiencing stress such as a personal crisis or the death of a loved one.

Chronic insomnias last for longer periods and are often linked to other medical conditions such as:

  • Cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and other disorders
  • Psychiatric conditions, such as depression and anxiety

Sufferers of insomnia usually experience a combination or all of the following symptoms:

  • Trouble falling asleep
  • Trouble staying asleep
  • Waking up in the morning lacking the energy and motivation to get through the day

Coffee Consumption

Of all of the caffeinated drinks, coffee is the most consumed worldwide. A growing body of research suggests that coffee and caffeine consumption can disrupt both human and animal circadian rhythms in negative ways.

Coffee harms sleep by:

  • Increasing the time it takes to fall asleep
  • Reducing total sleep time and quality
  • Lowering the production of melatonin by blocking adenosine receptors, which may worsen sleep quality in later life.

Jeongbin, Park, Ji HanWon, Ju LeeRi, ByunSeonjeong, Seung SuhWan, KimTae, In YoonYoung, and Ki KimWoong. “Lifetime coffee consumption, pineal gland volume, and sleep quality in late life.” SLEEP 41.10 (2018).

Practical Steps

First and foremost, if you suspect that you have insomnia it is important that you consult your medical advisor.

Thankfully, there are measures that you can take to help reduce the effects of (and even help you avoid) insomnia.

  • Go to bed and wake up at specific regular times.
    By doing this your body will soon be accustomed to a regular sleep pattern which will help you fall asleep more efficiently.

  • Regularly exercise, but not too close to bedtime.
    The benefits of exercise are too numerous to list here, but one of the major benefits is that it helps you have better quality sleep and this benefit can be felt almost immediately.

  • No caffeine (coffee, tea or sodas) after midday.
    The effects of caffeine can still affect your body several hours after consuming it. By limiting the times that you consume caffeine to before midday, you increase the chance that its effect on your nervous system and body will have worn off.

  • Don’t drink alcohol during the evening.
    Alcohol, like caffeine and tobacco, can interrupt your circadian rhythm. Unlike caffeine, alcohol increases the production of adenosine which helps you to fall asleep quickly. The problem is that as the alcohol effects wear off, production of adenosine also slows down which can trigger your body to wake up.

  • Avoid doing unpleasant tasks in the evening.
    Unpleasant tasks are stressful, and stress effects the quality of your sleep. Where possible save those tasks for the morning.

  • No daytime naps.
    Sleeping during the day takes away from your sleep at night. If this is happening regularly, then you risk upsetting your sleep pattern (see the first point). The difficulty comes in the form of being tired because you didn’t get a good night’s sleep the night before. Feeling tired throughout the day is no fun, especially if you are avoiding coffee and naps. That’s where V-CAF can help. This Apple Watch app monitors your tiredness and subtly alerts you when you are most likely to fall asleep or are too tired to concentrate.

  • Go to bed with the purpose to sleep, and not to do activities.
    By training yourself to think of your bed as the place to sleep, you are more likely to sleep when you go to bed. Stick with it, it takes time but in the long run will help you sleep better.

Review

Nobody knows you like you. If you are currently experiencing a lot of stress due to work, family or life in general, and you’ve been finding it difficult to sleep or get a good night’s sleep, then know that it’s one of those phases in life that will pass as quickly as it came.

However, if you’ve been suffering for more than a few weeks, you should seek medical advice as soon as possible to make sure that a serious medical ailment is source of your lack of quality sleep.

In any case, I’ve found it impowering in the past to take positive steps to help address an issue, as I feel that I’m doing something to help myself. Try any of these practical steps to help combat insomnia:

  • Go to bed and wake up at specific regular times.
  • Regularly exercise, but not too close to bedtime.
  • No caffeine (coffee, tea or sodas) after midday.
  • Don’t drink alcohol during the evening.
  • Avoid doing unpleasant tasks in the evening.
  • No daytime naps. Use V-CAF to help keep you awake during the day.
  • Go to bed with the purpose to sleep, and not to do activities.

Conclusion

Insomnia and coffee don’t mix. If you are having trouble sleeping, avoid caffeine at all costs.

By choosing to take the steps to help you beat insomnia, you make the battle a little easier.

All you have to do is decide to take action and start immediately.

Good luck.

Categories
Insomnia Staying Awake Tiredness

Insomnia – How Do I Get To Sleep?

Insomnia and Staying Awake

I want to sleep…

Like tiredness, insomnia is on the rise. An increasing number of people are getting less than six hours of sleep per night.

In America, approximately 30% of adults suffer from symptoms related to insomnia and roughly 10% of adults have insomnia that causes them distress during the day.

Whether you are suffering from short term or chronic insomnia, there are some common things that you can do to improve your quality and quantity of sleep.

Insomnia - Why can't I sleep
Photo by Ben Blennerhassett @benblenner on Unsplash

Do I Have Insomnia

Part of taking the appropriate action to combat insomnia is to be able to identify if you suffer from it.

Some of the symptoms of insomnia include:

  • Difficulty getting to sleep
  • Waking up frequently when you do get to sleep
  • It is rare that you get deep quality sleep and wake up still feeling tired
  • Waking up early and not being able to get back to sleep

Degrading Quality of Life

Although people suffering from insomnia can function as “normal” throughout the day even though they feel tired, they may suffer from the following symptoms:

  • Irritability
  • Daytime sleepiness
  • Lack of concentration
  • Reduced energy
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue

Some people, whilst trying to stay awake resort to consuming caffeine to stay alert and awake, not realizing that it may be compounding their lack of being able to sleep.

Small Steps

Just as there is rarely any-one cause of insomnia, there is no one cure-all to fix it. However, using a more holistic approach can yield great benefits for the sufferer.

These tips are just some of the strategies that you can use to help you overcome insomnia:

  • Avoid stimulants.
    Caffeine’s key effect is to keep us awake. Depending on our weight, age, gender and fitness it can stay in our bodies from between 3 to 8 hours. Avoid caffeine as much as possible.
  • Set a daily sleep routine. 
    Go to bed and wake up at the same times daily to train yourself that these are times for sleeping.
  • Avoid sleeping during the day.
    Easier said than done when you haven’t had a good nights sleep, especially if you are trying to avoid caffeine. V-CAF is an Apple Watch app that alerts you subtly when you are most likely to fall asleep, helping you avoid needing to drink caffeine.
  • Exercise
    Regular exercise will help you to have deeper sleep. Just don’t exercise close to the times that you set for going to bed (don’t exercise less than four hours before you go to bed).

Review

First changing your mindset and then changing your lifestyle can help you overcome insomnia in many cases.

Use the tips in this article together with any advice from your medical advisor to help structure a plan that will help you succeed.

Once again:

  • Avoid stimulants such as caffeine.
  • Set a daily sleeping routine.
  • Don’t nod off during the day; use a tool like V-CAF 
  • Do regular exercise

Conclusion

Hopefully you have a better understanding of how you can start to deal with insomnia.

Stay strong and stay focused.

Categories
Focus Productivity Staying Awake Tiredness

Are You Microsleeping Away Your Productivity?

Are You Microsleeping Away Your Productivity Levels?

Make micropayments back to yourself…

For a long period of my life I felt that I wasn’t performing at my best. Things that should have taken a relatively short amount of time were regularly taking me double the time I’d planned for them.

I started putting more effort into better planning and getting things done, but although at first it seemed to be working, my gains would soon stall and I’d be back to struggling to complete my tasks on time.

The answer finally came to me when I was being told by my boss that I needed to stop nodding off and pull myself together.

I had read about microsleep a few years prior and now realized that it was a big component in my lack of productivity.

Sleepy cat
Photo by Wes Hicks @sickhews on Unsplash

What Is Microsleep?

Microsleep as the name suggests, is a short burst of sleep, usually lasting from between a fraction of a second and 30 seconds.

Just like normal sleep, you will be unaware of what is going on around you, and consciousness can shift in waves between being awake and unawake.

Tell tail signs of microsleep are head nodding, drooping eyelids and slow eyelid-closures.

Microsleep is usually the result of sleep deprivation or participating in monotonous tasks.

The Effects of Microsleep

It is a well-established fact that sleep restriction and deprivation decrease performance. Lack of sleep makes you feel sleepy.

This can cause sudden bursts of sleep, and even if you can manage to stay awake, reduce cognitive performance.

Reduced cognitive performance affects your productivity by:

  • Reducing your ability to pay continuous, sustained attention.
  • Slows down your reaction time and increases the amount of errors you make.
  • Decreases your ability to learn and form memories.
  • And significantly affects your ability to plan and coordinate your actions effectively.

Overcoming Microsleep

Once I realized that this was my problem it made it easier to adjust and take positive steps to correcting behaviors that were making my productivity problem worse.

  • I planned my days and weeks around my sleep and not the other way around. 

    At first this meant not staying late at work, and getting more sleep. As things progressed for the better I changed to going to sleep in tune with my body’s circadian rhythm whenever I could. 

    This allowed for me to stay late at work, but not so late as to make me miss my sleeping schedule. Research showed that it would be best to get to bed between 9pm and 10pm, and wake up around 7am.
  • I limited the amount of time I spent in “hectic, heavy workload” mode. 

    As work or study life is not so straight forward, I made room for heavy workload periods and tried to limit them to 2-3 week sprints. 

    During those sprints I would sleep longer during a Saturday evening – Sunday morning to catch up on sleep that I may have missed and also to recover and prepare for the next week ahead. 

    At the end of the sprint I would catch up on sleep and relaxation for a few days.
  • Whilst working, I monitored myself for signs of tiredness and took short breaks or naps when I could.

    When I first tried this I had to watch my thoughts and see if my mind was wandering. This let me know that I may be about to fall asleep. But sometimes I felt my head nodding, or actually felt like I was asleep!

    A more accurate way to see if I was tired or about to fall asleep was to use a tiredness monitor called V-CAF. It’s an Apple Watch app that vibrates both your iPhone and Apple Watch when you are tired or about to fall asleep.

    The iPhone part of the app sounds an alarm and flashes when you are tired. I use that when I’m working by myself. 

    When I’m in the office I switch the app to discreet mode and put the iPhone in my pocket. Now when I’m alerted both the iPhone and Apple watch vibrate without anyone else needing to know that I’m tired.

    This naturally alerts me to take a break so that I can have a nap or do something to wake myself up, before getting back to work.

Review

I still use this approach and my productivity has never been higher. I’ve been able to hold down my job as well as write for this blog and help develop V-CAF, which only a relatively short time ago seemed impossible.

You are you however, and it is almost a certainty that you will have to pick and choose, and modify these suggestions for your unique circumstance.

This was a fairly long article; so here are the main points in short form:

  • Plan your work around your sleep.
  • When that is not possible, limit the longer hours but shorter sleep to 2-3 weeks and catch up on sleep at the weekend.
  • When you feel yourself getting tired whilst working, stop and take a break to wake yourself up. Better yet use V-CAF to accurately tell you when you are tired.

Conclusion

Making a few simple thought adjustments and lifestyle changes can positively influence the level of your productivity.

It can be difficult to start, but once you do and start seeing the results you’ll thank yourself for doing so.