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Addiction Caffeine Caffeine Addiction Caffeine Alternative Energy Fatigue Headaches Productivity Side Effects Sleep Sleepiness Staying Awake

Is Now The Right Time To Give Up Coffee?

Too Costly To Your Health

It’s the price your willing to pay that counts…

We live in a connected world. The saying goes “when America sneezes, the whole world catches a cold”, (but actually the original saying was “when France sneezes, the whole of Europe catches a cold”). Replace “America” (or France) with any leading nation or person in a given field and you have the current situation of the world.

Whether it be semi conductors, lumber or facial mask shortages, we are all learning just how connected we truly are. Which brings us to Brazil and coffee. Brazil represents one third of the world’s coffee production, making the country the undisputed coffee production world leader.

Unfortunately, Brazil in 2021 has had some challenging issues to deal with, each of them having an effect on the production and distribution of coffee. Brazil has been suffering through a drought which has decreased crop production, whilst at the same time due to the pandemic, shipping ports have been congested (especially in the US), causing US coffee stockpiles to shrink to their lowest levels in at least six years!

The implications for coffee drinkers is that the price of their favourite beverage is about to increase significantly, whilst the quality and quantity of their favourite brands decrease. For those struggling to give up caffeine or wanting to break their coffee addiction, the recent and future price increases may just help motivate them to start.

The Price to Pay

Coffee seems to fuel the world. The wonder drink is seen by some as being responsible for a majority of the technological and scientific discoveries of the Western World, but in all truth it’s the caffeine that is in coffee that is responsible.

Caffeine and coffee go hand in hand. Researchers have found that the majority of adults in the USA admit to consuming a caffeinated drink at least daily. And why not? It’s been proven time and again that caffeine improves alertness and performance, and it appears to counter feelings of fatigue and tiredness. And lately there have been an increasing amount of studies that show the numerous health benefits of drinking coffee and caffeine such as helping to increase fat loss and helping to reduce the risk of developing cancer.

Also, with the rise in popularity and profitability of coffee shops and franchises, the global coffee shop market is set to be worth $237.6 billion by 2025 (Global Coffee Shops Market to be Worth $237.6 Billion by), coffee’s importance doesn’t look like it is going to diminish any time soon.

So with the recent drought in Brazil and supply chain disruptions, it’s fair to say that the average price of a cup of coffee will be increasing.

Coffee prices increased in March and global coffee consumption is projected to rise this year, according to the International Coffee Organization (ICO).

Americans were reported to be drinking “more coffee than ever,” according to a March 2020 report by the National Coffee Association. The pandemic led to “record coffee consumption at home, with 85 percent of coffee drinkers having at least one cup at home,” according to the NCA’s Spring 2021 National Coffee Data Trends (NCDT) survey.

Soo Kim, Newsweek, source: Prices of Coffee, Wine, Toilet Paper and More Set to Rise in Post COVID-19 Era

Although the rise in price may not deter most people from drinking coffee, now may be as good a time as any to review why we drink coffee (and hence caffeine), and break any dependencies that we may have with the duo.

 

Cost of Benefits

Caffeine exacerbates sleep disorders, according to a study reported in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Some coffee drinkers, however, claim that their sleep is as restful as ever, regardless of their caffeine consumption. And without statistical evidence, who can refute their testimony? While it is obvious that caffeine affects all of us in different ways, it is equally important to note that we often do not know how it affects our system and cannot evaluate its effects on us while we sleep.

Another researcher noted that coffee consumption not only substantially delays the onset of sleep, but also diminishes the quality of sleep. Significantly more body movement was noted in heavy coffee consumers, and the quality of their sleep was substantially diminished.

Kushner, Marina. The Truth About Coffee (p. 69). SCR, Inc.

Whilst there are many of us that like the taste and effect that coffee has on us, there is no getting away from the fact that it’s main ingredient, caffeine, can be an addictive substance. Many coffee consumers are unaware of their addiction and believe that they can go a few days without any, but find that they never get round to their coffee abstinence, or if they do unintentionally find themselves consuming caffeine in another form.

A little while ago I posted a link on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram about two couples that tried to give up coffee for a month who thought that it would be easy, but found that they had underestimated just how addicted to coffee and caffeine they were, (We Quit Caffeine for a Month, Here’s What Happened). They suffered from all the classic withdrawal symptoms that many people experience and gradually started to come to the realisation that they needed their daily fix.

To be fair, they did start to reduce their caffeine consumption leading up to the challenge and even then they found themselves feeling:

  • More tired than usual
  • Irritated
  • suffering from headaches

And in addition to the list above, during the challenge they found themselves:

  • Unable to think straight
  • Craving coffee and caffeine
  • Relapsing back to coffee
  • Being in denial about their caffeine addiction

By the end of the challenge WheezyWaiter, (the owners of the YouTube channel that initiated the challenge), were more than relieved to get back to drinking coffee and found that they had more energy than they did during their abstinence, and didn’t feel that there sleep improved during the challenge compared to how they sleep now.

The researchers studied sleep patterns of medical students and found that many of them claimed that coffee did not disturb their sleep even when objective observations confirmed that it did. The researchers said that this denial reinforces the impression that coffee drinkers simply do not attribute undesirable clinical symptoms to their coffee intake.

This situation illuminates one of the insidious aspects of coffee addiction: we are often unaware of how it affects us.

Kushner, Marina. The Truth About Coffee (p. 69). SCR, Inc.

Unfortunately it seems that WheezyWaiter weren’t aware that caffeine withdrawal symptoms can last for weeks for some people, and that although consuming caffeine relieves those symptoms and make it seem that coffee actually helps them feel better, it can eventually lead to an increase in tolerance to the effects of caffeine, making it more than likely that they will consume more (in fact, they said that at the end of the challenge, they found that their coffee works better now, which may indicate that they had a very high tolerance before starting the challenge, and have effectively reset their tolerance levels lower).

I would suggest that WheezyWaiter should be cautious from this point on with regards to their coffee consumption, because it’s at higher levels of consumption that we start to increase the risk that we expose ourselves to some of the more harmful effects of caffeine.

Although it has many health benefits and has long been used by people for its stimulating effects, it also comes with various health hazards. Caffeine consumption is linked to the risk of developing coronary artery disease, osteoporosis, gastritis, anaemia and still births. Other adverse effects of caffeine include sleep deprivation, increased heart rate and blood pressure, central nervous system disorders, vasodilation, trembling, seizures, urticaria, headaches, increased body temperature and behavioural changes. In people consuming caffeine on regular basis, it has been found that the cessation of caffeine results in many unfavourable changes such as increased occurrence of headaches, increased drowsiness and fatigue as well as lowered alertness. The various ill-effects of excessive caffeine consumption include addiction, hormone-related cancers, increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, anxiety, insomnia, intoxication and nutrient malabsorption. It affects bones by decreasing calcium absorption in the human small intestine. It is also known to affect gastrointestinal, respiratory and reproductive health.

Kumar, V., Kaur, J., Panghal, A., Kaur, S., & Handa, V. (2018). Caffeine: a boon or bane. /Nutrition & Food Science,/ /48(1),/ 61-75.

Alternatives

The current and impending rise in price for a cup of coffee and knowing the harmful effects of over consuming caffeine, coupled with supply chain failures, it seems to me that now would be a good time to either cut down on the amount of coffee we consume or give it up all together.

With that in mind here are some things that we can do help ease the pain of giving up coffee (or just reducing the amount we consume).

For tiredness and energy:

  • Get your 7-9 hours of good quality sleep regularly
  • Eat nutrient rich foods such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, grass fed meats, whole milk etc
  • Avoid or reduce the amount of processed foods and snacks that you consume throughout the day
  • Take regular exercise (like a 20 minute walk a day, or regular breaks during the day where you move more than you are now).
  • Meditate regularly (and it doesn’t have to be too long, for example sitting in a chair closing your eyes and deep breathing for a couple of minutes can be very beneficial).

For concentration and productivity:

  • All of the above mentioned points
  • Plan your days and weeks in advance. Knowing what you need to do beforehand helps reduce the stress of trying to do things ad hoc
  • Take regular breaks whilst working, studying or concentrating. 25 – 45 minute blocks are usually enough for your brain to stay active and focused on your tasks
  • Limit your coffee intake to only once a day, and use it for your most difficult tasks, no later than 12 in the afternoon, but ideally, go without, or at least work towards going without (take small steps).

Review

I was in denial for a long time about my own coffee addiction, but when I suffered a bad case of the jitters, I had to face up to the fact that I had caffeine addiction problem.

It can be hard to motivate yourself to get through the withdrawal symptoms even if you have a support network in place (watch the WheezyWaiter YouTube video to see what I’m talking about); but I’ve found that just by knowing why you are doing something, you increase the chances of sticking through the hard times and overcoming any adversity.

If you found yourself getting upset about the recent coffee price increases and shortages that will be manifesting themselves shortly (if not already), maybe you should try quitting coffee for a short while.

What have you got to lose?

Afterword

There are many physiological effects of caffeine on respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive and central nervous systems. It has a positive effect in reducing the risk of diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and liver injury and, at the same time, in improving mood, psychomotor performance and immune response. On the other hand, the negative effects of caffeine include addiction, cancer, heart diseases, insomnia, gastrointestinal disturbances and intoxication. As caffeine, when taken in a large amount, is harmful… its concentration should not exceed set limits.

Kumar, V., Kaur, J., Panghal, A., Kaur, S., & Handa, V. (2018). Caffeine: a boon or bane. /Nutrition & Food Science,/ /48(1),/ 61-75.
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Caffeine Side Effects

How the Media Gets It Wrong About Coffee

How the Media Gets It Wrong About Coffee

The Media and Uncommon Sense

I watched a short documentary about coffee the other day (17 September, 2019 https://www.bbc.com/reel/video/p07nkgsb/how-the-world-came-to-run-on-coffee ) which I thought would be in a similar line of thought as an article that I wrote a few months ago, What The Top Coffee Bean Producers Don’t Want You To Know.

Unfortunately it turned it to be a puff piece, celebrating the rise in coffee’s popularity across the world, especially in Asia. Although I have nothing against coffee itself, what struck me was the constant reinforcement of the idea that coffee fuels your brain to get things done.

Frustrated at the blatant misrepresentation of the effects that coffee has on our bodies, I decided to do my bit, however small, to redress the balance.

How the Media Gets It Wrong About Coffee
Photo by Fernando Hernandez @_ferh97 on Unsplash, Baja California, Ensenada, Mexico, flat screen television on top of desk

The Coffee and Productivity Myth

Conventional wisdom states that if you have to stay awake and be alert, few things work better than coffee.

People’s own experience with coffee seems to prove this to be the case, as an ever growing amount of people turn to coffee to get them going in the morning.

In fact many people feel that they can’t function at their peak performance levels without having their daily coffee fix. For example, it’s rare these days for me to attend a meeting where nobody is sipping a coffee.

Socially acceptable, and as the documentary shows, growing in popularity, the coffee industry’s profits are set to head for the stars.

“In terms of liquid beverage equivalents, coffee belongs among the most-drunk beverages worldwide with roughly 42.6 litres per person and year (12.6 litres of Roast Coffee and 30 litres of Instant Coffee).

Another trend is the redefinition of coffee from commodified caffeination to sensual experience which has driven premiumization.“

Statista – Coffee, Worldwide

The big coffee companies are trying to increase the demand for their products with the aim of boosting their incomes and profits. What’s often overlooked and even dismissed by some is the effect of coffee on the health of consumers.

The Cost to Your Health

For adults, coffee is the most consumed caffeinated beverage. A lot of people see coffee as the go to pick me up without giving a second thought to what it might be doing to their bodily system.

The FDA recommends a daily intake of two to three cups of coffee per day, but many have at least four cups or more.

The long term habitual consumption of coffee can have detrimental effects to your health.

Some of the more common side effects of too much coffee include:

  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Sleeping issues
  • Anxiousness
  • Depression

Redressing the Balance

To avoid the risks associated with long term coffee consumption reduce the amount of caffeine that you consume per day.

Also:

  • Take the time to observe your daily habits.
    For example write down the times of day that you find yourself craving a coffee as well as where, with whom and what you were doing. If your aim is to reduce the amount of coffee you drink, choose a time that you regularly have a cup and replace the coffee with a glass of water or other beverage (as long as it doesn’t contain caffeine).
  • Eat healthy.
    Just eating healthy alone will not boost your energy; that comes from taking more informed lifestyle choices. That said, cutting down on the amount of sugar you eat, eating more wholegrain or wholemeal starchy carbohydrates (which will give you a slower more sustained release of energy), and getting enough iron (from eating beans, nuts, liver, dried fruit and dark green leafy vegetables), can go some way to helping you feel more energised over time.
  • Get enough sleep.
    As stated earlier, drinking coffee doesn’t boost your energy, it blocks your brains adenosine receptors, tricking your body into thinking that it is not tired. By reducing (or eliminating) coffee and caffeine from your diet, you can get back in line with your body’s circadian rhythm and optimise your sleep, which in turn will make you feel less tired during your waking hours.
  • Exercise more.
    Exercise has been proven to boost your mind’s focus and concentration, as well as increasing your fitness levels. What is sometimes missed is that it also helps you have better, deeper sleep sessions. And as an extra benefit the quality of your sleep is increased immediately.

Media Influence

Media corporations put out a lot of information everyday on many topics from across the world.

It is difficult to get points across without having to resort to cultural shortcuts to get a point of view across. As a result, sometimes, unwittingly these corporations can overlook the implications of what they broadcast.

Which is why informed individuals should speak up when they notice something that may mislead or confuse.

Conclusion

Reading this, the chances are that you already know what has been stated in this post and I thank you for your time.

If there is anyone you feel would benefit from this article please share.

Categories
Alert Caffeine Focus Productivity Staying Awake Study Studying

Coffee vs Tea for Studying

Choose Your Poison

Study This Study About Studying

In the past when studying for exams or to learn a new subject at work, I resorted to coffee and/or caffeine pills to keep me alert.

Some colleagues used to tell me to drink tea as it does less harm to your body than coffee. Others swore that coffee is the best at keeping you alert and getting the job done, and did I know “that green tea contains more caffeine than coffee?”

After looking at the little research that’s out there, I figured out what was best for me and outline how I came to that conclusion in this article.

Coffee or Tea? Which One Is Better?
Photo by Dan Preindl @preindl on Unsplash, Little Bourke Street, Melbourne, Australia

Depending on Coffee or Tea for Alertness

For a lot of people, drinking coffee or tea helps them feel more alert and therefore more productive whilst working. 

Whenever I had a difficult subject to study for, or was feeling tired, I would instinctively go for a cup of coffee, which once drunk, made me feel that I could get the work done. 

For others, like my friend Jason, tea was the way to go. He felt that he didn’t get such a fast caffeine high, and therefore caffeine low as when he drunk coffee, whilst still feeling more alert than he did before he drunk his tea. “Each to their own”, I used to reply.

I now think that Jason might have been onto something. Although tea contains more caffeine than coffee in its dry form, once brewed, coffee has significantly more caffeine than tea (depending on the types of tea and coffee being compared).

Further, according to TeaClass.com:

“The high levels of antioxidants found in tea slow the absorption of caffeine – this results in a gentler increase of the chemical in the system and a longer period of alertness with no crash at the end.”

The Truth About Caffeine

Jason was right and I was wrong. Better switch over to drinking tea to get more productive, right?

Is Drinking Either Coffee or Tea the Solution?

The thing is, is that both coffee and tea contain caffeine; a stimulant that tricks your brain into thinking that it’s not as tired as it really is, and as a result makes you think that you are more alert and productive.

Back to feelings. Many confuse the feeling of alertness that caffeine induces to be a sign of the potential for increased productivity and enhanced mental performance. Unfortunately, just like how caffeine tricks the brain into thinking that it is less tired than it really is, this enhanced productivity is also a delusion.

“While caffeine benefits motor performance and tolerance develops to its tendency to increase anxiety/jitteriness, tolerance to its effects on sleepiness means that frequent consumption fails to enhance mental alertness and mental performance.”

Rogers, Peter, Susan Heatherley, Emma Mullings, and Jessica Smith. “Faster but not smarter: effects of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on alertness and performance.” Psychopharmacology 226.2 (2013): 229-240.

So, What Works?

Getting more quality sleep works best, hands down. The benefits of regular, good quality sleep are so numerous, I’ll have to write a separate article detailing them.

In the meantime, here are some tips that you can use to help your study/work be more effective:

  • Get into Rhythm 
    Organize your life to match your body’s circadian rhythm. Wake up at around 7am (melatonin stops being released by this time).
    Do your most important work between 10am and 12pm.
    Between 12pm-2pm is usually when we have our midafternoon crash, so avoid difficult work during this time.
    Our body hits peak energy around 6:30pm so if you’re still working start to slowly wind down your efforts.
    Resist the temptation to pull an all-nighter, and try to get to bed around 10pm.
  • Drink Water
    Keeping yourself hydrated will help keep you alert whilst keeping fatigue and tiredness at bay and reducing the risk of headaches and poor concentration.
  • Take Regular Breaks
    When you feel yourself getting fatigued, take a break and get up and move around. 
    The reality is, is that most people don’t realize when they are tired until they are so tired that it can’t be ignored! V-CAF is an Apple Watch app that subtly notifies you to move around and take a natural break when your body says that you are tired.
  • Exercise
    Take the time to incorporate exercise into your daily routine. It could be as simple as a 25-30 minute walk each day or walking upstairs instead of taking the elevator. Exercise helps improve your focus and concentration as well as increasing the quality of your sleep. And the effects can be felt immediately. 

Review

If you have to choose between coffee and tea to help keep you awake, then I would suggest tea. However, I think this is a false dichotomy. The third option is to avoid caffeine and make lifestyle changes that in the long term benefit your health as well as your productivity.

Some of these choices include:

  • Get into your body’s circadian rhythm.
  • Drink more water
  • Take Regular Breaks and use a tool such as V-CAF that subtly notifies you to move around and take a natural break.
  • Exercise regularly.

Conclusion

Study and work goals are important parts of our lives, but not the only part.

One of the most fundamental parts of our lives is sleep. By sacrificing our sleep, we are damaging all other parts of our lives.

Knowing that a single night of sleep deprivation can decrease our cognitive performance by 30%, does it really make sense to reduce the amount of time we spend sleeping to get more studying/work done?

Categories
Caffeine Insomnia Sleep Tiredness

Coffee, Does It Cause Insomnia?

Insomnia & Coffee, Not A Good Mix

Coffee fuels my insomnia!

Insomnia and sleep disorders in general are on the rise. Whilst many news outlets tend to focus on blaming the obesity epidemic, social media and stress, few if any fail to mention that stimulants may have a role in increasing this trend.

Insomnia is a complicated disease, so I won’t be giving a “do x to solve y” type of article!

The aim is to highlight the facts about Insomnia and practical steps you can take to avoid or reduce its effects on your health.

Insomnia Mixed With Coffee
Photo by Jon Tyson @jontyson on Unsplash

Insomnia

If you seek the advice of a qualified health professional they would typically proceed to ask questions about how long you have been suffering, ask about your lifestyle and daily habits as well as questions related to stress and anything that might have an emotional impact on you recently.

This is done to attempt to diagnose the type of insomnia that you may have. Although there are many sources that can cause insomnia, medical professionals classify insomnia in two categories.

Transient insomnias, also known as short term or acute insomnias, last between a few days and a few weeks. A lot of people suffer short term insomnia whilst experiencing stress such as a personal crisis or the death of a loved one.

Chronic insomnias last for longer periods and are often linked to other medical conditions such as:

  • Cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and other disorders
  • Psychiatric conditions, such as depression and anxiety

Sufferers of insomnia usually experience a combination or all of the following symptoms:

  • Trouble falling asleep
  • Trouble staying asleep
  • Waking up in the morning lacking the energy and motivation to get through the day

Coffee Consumption

Of all of the caffeinated drinks, coffee is the most consumed worldwide. A growing body of research suggests that coffee and caffeine consumption can disrupt both human and animal circadian rhythms in negative ways.

Coffee harms sleep by:

  • Increasing the time it takes to fall asleep
  • Reducing total sleep time and quality
  • Lowering the production of melatonin by blocking adenosine receptors, which may worsen sleep quality in later life.

Jeongbin, Park, Ji HanWon, Ju LeeRi, ByunSeonjeong, Seung SuhWan, KimTae, In YoonYoung, and Ki KimWoong. “Lifetime coffee consumption, pineal gland volume, and sleep quality in late life.” SLEEP 41.10 (2018).

Practical Steps

First and foremost, if you suspect that you have insomnia it is important that you consult your medical advisor.

Thankfully, there are measures that you can take to help reduce the effects of (and even help you avoid) insomnia.

  • Go to bed and wake up at specific regular times.
    By doing this your body will soon be accustomed to a regular sleep pattern which will help you fall asleep more efficiently.

  • Regularly exercise, but not too close to bedtime.
    The benefits of exercise are too numerous to list here, but one of the major benefits is that it helps you have better quality sleep and this benefit can be felt almost immediately.

  • No caffeine (coffee, tea or sodas) after midday.
    The effects of caffeine can still affect your body several hours after consuming it. By limiting the times that you consume caffeine to before midday, you increase the chance that its effect on your nervous system and body will have worn off.

  • Don’t drink alcohol during the evening.
    Alcohol, like caffeine and tobacco, can interrupt your circadian rhythm. Unlike caffeine, alcohol increases the production of adenosine which helps you to fall asleep quickly. The problem is that as the alcohol effects wear off, production of adenosine also slows down which can trigger your body to wake up.

  • Avoid doing unpleasant tasks in the evening.
    Unpleasant tasks are stressful, and stress effects the quality of your sleep. Where possible save those tasks for the morning.

  • No daytime naps.
    Sleeping during the day takes away from your sleep at night. If this is happening regularly, then you risk upsetting your sleep pattern (see the first point). The difficulty comes in the form of being tired because you didn’t get a good night’s sleep the night before. Feeling tired throughout the day is no fun, especially if you are avoiding coffee and naps. That’s where V-CAF can help. This Apple Watch app monitors your tiredness and subtly alerts you when you are most likely to fall asleep or are too tired to concentrate.

  • Go to bed with the purpose to sleep, and not to do activities.
    By training yourself to think of your bed as the place to sleep, you are more likely to sleep when you go to bed. Stick with it, it takes time but in the long run will help you sleep better.

Review

Nobody knows you like you. If you are currently experiencing a lot of stress due to work, family or life in general, and you’ve been finding it difficult to sleep or get a good night’s sleep, then know that it’s one of those phases in life that will pass as quickly as it came.

However, if you’ve been suffering for more than a few weeks, you should seek medical advice as soon as possible to make sure that a serious medical ailment is source of your lack of quality sleep.

In any case, I’ve found it impowering in the past to take positive steps to help address an issue, as I feel that I’m doing something to help myself. Try any of these practical steps to help combat insomnia:

  • Go to bed and wake up at specific regular times.
  • Regularly exercise, but not too close to bedtime.
  • No caffeine (coffee, tea or sodas) after midday.
  • Don’t drink alcohol during the evening.
  • Avoid doing unpleasant tasks in the evening.
  • No daytime naps. Use V-CAF to help keep you awake during the day.
  • Go to bed with the purpose to sleep, and not to do activities.

Conclusion

Insomnia and coffee don’t mix. If you are having trouble sleeping, avoid caffeine at all costs.

By choosing to take the steps to help you beat insomnia, you make the battle a little easier.

All you have to do is decide to take action and start immediately.

Good luck.

Categories
Caffeine Side Effects Sleepiness Staying Awake Tiredness

Would You Pay For Worse Sleep?

Would You Pay For Worse Sleep?

A good night’s sleep is priceless

We humans like the effects that caffeine has on us. It is one of the worlds most consumed stimulants and can be found in a variety of food, drink, and medical supplements.

However, there is a growing body of evidence that points to caffeine being responsible for interfering with our sleep and may be responsible for daytime sleepiness. 

Customer experience
Photo by Toa Heftiba @heftiba on Unsplash Customer experience, Camber Coffee, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom

I’m Tired, Where’s The Coffee

It’s common for us to associate coffee and caffeine with alertness. So much so that we have hundreds of coffee phrases such as “Once you wake up and smell the coffee, it’s hard to go back to sleep” and  “I don’t have a problem with caffeine. I have a problem without it.”

For many people a coffee first thing in the morning helps wake them up and sets them straight for the day, but by the time they get to work they need another, then another.

What most don’t realize is that it might be the caffeine that is making them feel tired in the first place!

Increased Tiredness

Various population-based studies suggest that ingesting more than the recommended daily limit for caffeine can be linked to daytime sleepiness. 
Ohayon MM, Malijai C, Pierre P. Guilleminault C, Priest RG. How sleep and mental disorders are related to complaints of daytime sleepiness. Arch Intern Med 1997;157(22):2645-52.

A Sleep Habits and Caffeine Use study of workers for the French National Gas and Electricity Company found a link between an increase of consumption of caffeine and the decrease of time spent in bed. The association suggests that caffeine is shortening sleep.
Sanchez-Ortuno M, Moore N, Taillard J, Valtat C, Leger D, Bioulac B, et al. Sleep duration and caffeine consumption in a French middle-aged working population. Sleep Med 2005;6:247-51.

Daily moderate to low usage of caffeine can interfere with your sleep and contribute to some people’s insomnia complaints; but stopping caffeine consumption can cause people to experience excessive sleepiness.

Decrease Tiredness

If you don’t consume a lot of caffeine then cycling your caffeine intake will keep you balanced without affecting your energy too much. That is, enjoy your caffeine product as usual but take a couple of days a week where you don’t have any. 

If you do consume a lot of caffeine then it may be best to gradually wean yourself off over several weeks. If you suffer from withdrawal, use the following:

  • Keep yourself occupied.
    By keeping busy you will have less time to think about your cravings.
  • Exercise.
    It helps lift your mood and helps you to have better quality sleep.
  • Have a sleep routine.
    Choose a time to go to bed and to wake up and stick to it. Be mindful of falling asleep during the day, and use a tiredness monitor like V-CAF. V-CAF will notify you when you are most likely to fall asleep, helping you to stay awake during the day.
  • Eat nutrient rich foods and drink plenty of water.
    Fuelling your body with the right foods and drinking water helps raise your energy over time.

Review

Over reliance on caffeine is causing us to deplete our energy levels. Reducing our caffeine intake or cutting it out completely can help reverse this trend but may initially make us feel even more tired.

Withdrawal tips:

  • Keep busy
  • Exercise
  • Stick to your sleep routine. 
  • Use a tiredness monitor, like V-CAF to keep you awake during the day.
  • Eat whole foods and drink plenty of water.

Conclusion

Your body deserves the best treatment that you can provide. Using caffeine ultimately takes from you and gives very little back.

Spend your time and energy on the things that will help enhance your life, not on things that cost you money and give you suffering.

Start giving back by following the advise in this post and making the right lifestyle changes.

You deserve it.

Categories
Caffeine Caffeine Addiction Sleep Tiredness

Caffeine and the Herd

Are You A Herd Follower?

Break free, be you…

Currently I am on a course learning about how to understand current market conditions and how to maneuver through them in these challenging times.

Everyone in the course seems very intelligent and if not at the top of their game, very near it. They all strike me as being independent thinkers and more suited to be leaders rather than followers.

The course instructor is intelligent and quick-witted and keeps everyone engaged. However, I couldn’t help but notice that he made a point of telling us the times of the coffee breaks, where the coffee was located and how much it costs.

At the break times more than half of the attendees would have a cup of coffee or at least debate having one. No big deal. A few of them in conversation told me that they needed their coffee in the morning to wake up, others said they drink out of habit.

This got me thinking about a study I read that suggested that a lot of people start drinking coffee or caffeine drinks because of social or work etiquette. The study went on to say that those who do have a caffeine dependency tended to develop them whilst working or studying.

So, in this article I’ll be looking into the role of peer pressure plays in peoples caffeine dependency.

break out from the herd
Photo by Theo Leconte @theoo on Unsplash A cow

Caffeine is the most commonly used legal stimulant. The majority of us get our fix via coffee, tea and soda.

It is noted in Wikipedia as a “Notable Stimulant” and is stated as being the world’s most widely used psychoactive drug.
Stimulant, Wikipedia 

Yet most don’t see it as a drug and rarely think about the effects that overdosing may have on their physiology. Caffeine is seen as normal and is entrenched in our culture. The following quote from Scientific American indicates how caffeine consumption has become part of our daily experience:

“Morning commuters seem to fall into one of two categories: the Caffeinated and the Un-caffeinated…

The Caffeinated are bright-eyed and engaged with the day’s events already—they’re reading their morning papers, or checking email, or reading for pleasure…

This is not the case for the Un-Caffeinated. This group sleeps through the AM commute both on the commuter trains and the subway. They’re bleary eyed.

The line that runs out the door of the Starbucks across from my job never seems to shrink. Are the ranks of the Caffeinated growing?

The culture of coffee has been carefully cultivated to ensure maximum reach.”

Krystal D’Costa August 11, 2011, Scientific American 

Pressure

In 2018 the global caffeine market was valued at $340 million, of which North America was the largest consumer (12,572 metric tons), 36% of global consumption.

Caffeine production is dominated by 11 companies, which account for 89% of global production. China is the largest global producer with a 54% share in the market. India is the second largest producer. The biggest companies are:

  • CSPC 
  • BASF 
  • Shandong Xinhua 
  • Kudos Chemie Limited 
  • Aarti Healthcare 
  • Zhongan Pharmaceutical 
  • Jilin Shulan 
  • Youhua Pharmaceutical 
  • Spectrum Chemical

MarketWatch

The market is expected to grow to $610 million by 2025. This translates to a projected increase in demand of 179.41%. Where do you think that demand is going to come from?

The global coffee industry is worth over $100 billion, and is currently experiencing compound annual growth rate of 5.5%.

“the coffee market is currently experiencing considerable growth in economies around the world, with the rise in urbanization and the demand for quick, quality product fueling the expansion.  The market is expected to continue to inflate in the next five years, leaving ample room for returns and profit.”

Andrew Menke, The Global Coffee Industry, Global Edge 

Manufactured demand for caffeine products is well underway now. Maybe it’s time to start asking questions about why you consume caffeinated products. 

Is it really your choice, or is something/someone else at work here?

Uniquely You

And now we can look at the bigger picture a bit clearer. Cultural norms can be created to get us to act in predetermined ways. Whilst good for companies, they are not necessarily always for our benefit.

I have outlined some of the effects of the overconsumption of caffeine in other articles in an attempt to bring awareness to this issue.

I believe that the best way to deal with the effects of over consuming caffeine is to take positive actions that will help us to reclaim control over our lives and ourselves.

This blog and our app, V-CAF, is an attempt by us to try to make a difference by being the difference we want to see in the world.

The following tips are things that I found useful to help me overcome my tiredness and lack of motivation:

  • Exercise – raises energy the old fashioned way by increasing our  body’s capability to deal with stress, and expands endurance. The benefits are too numerous to list here but, it just works.
  • Sleep – exercise helps us to have better quality deeper sleep. Sometimes the amount of sleep is not enough, but deep quality sleep is what we should be striving for.
  • Tiredness – feeling tired led to the development of V-CAF an Apple Watch app that subtlety informs you when you are most likely to fall asleep. By knowing that you are tired you can take measures to help bring your alertness and focus back to where you need it more efficiently.
  • Eat well – good quality whole foods will give your body the fuel it needs to get through the day. Also by eating healthily you can increase your energy and raise your mood.
  • Drink Water – keeping your brain hydrated will do wonders for your focus and alertness whilst helping your body to cleanse itself.

Review

Don’t follow the herd and take control of yourself. There is nothing wrong with drinking coffee or consuming caffeinated products in moderation. However, if you find yourself doing anything because of habit, ask yourself why?

Here are the takeaways:

  • Do Exercise
  • Get Deep Sleep
  • Use tools like V-CAF to help keep you notified of when you feel tired.
  • Eat Good Quality Whole Foods
  • Drink Water

Conclusion

If you don’t take control of your own life, someone else will.

Each one of us is unique and responds differently to stimuli.

Remember this and reclaim your most valuable asset, you.

Categories
Caffeine Staying Awake

Changing Your Lifestyle to Stay Awake

Lifestyle & Staying Awake

Your choices matter

In the age of the Internet we have grown accustomed to quick fixes and instant gratification. Information on almost anything is just a few keystrokes and mouse clicks away.

The pervasiveness of this expectation has permeated into our natural world, where we now believe that there is a product or gadget that can fix almost anything quickly without too much effort.

To stay and be more awake is the result of lifestyle choices that we make. This article will highlight some of those choices.  

pensive
Photo by charlotte henard @punttim on Flickr pensive

Tiredness Quick Fixes

During the course of a day, when tired many people reach for a coffee, an energy drink or caffeine pills.

The need for immediate alertness overrides any concerns about the long time effects of that choice.

The quick fix then becomes reinforced as the response to tiredness further entrenching it as the default behavior.

The Problem With Quick Fixes

Although they have their place, using quick fixes as the default response to tiredness robs us of an opportunity to learn about the relationship we have with our own body.

The more you consume caffeine the greater your tolerance becomes, which in turn encourages you to increases the amount you consume.

Between 200-250mg per day is considered safe (depending on age, sex and health). Anything above 400mg (approx. 4 cups of coffee) increases your chances of being exposed to caffeine’s side effects, including and not limited to:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Tremors
  • Convulsions

Lifestyle Choices

To have more control over your tiredness you will need to make the choice to invest the time to learn about yourself.

Below are some ideas to get you thinking.

  • Are you drinking enough water?
    Drink a lot of water daily, before you start feeling tired.
  • How much processed food are you eating?
    Our brains use 1/5 of our total daily energy needs. Stimulants trick our brains into reacting as if they are not tired. After the effects wear off, we crash. To avoid that, fuel your brain by eating whole foods, especially those with complex long-chain carbohydrates (nuts, fish, avocado etc.), as they release energy steadily.
  • Do you know when you are tired?
    When we are tired our brains do not react as accurately and efficiently as they do when we are fully awake, and clouds our judgment about how tired we really are. Use an Apple Watch app such as V-CAF, which alerts you when you are most likely to be tired. 
  • How much quality sleep are you getting?
    Quality is better than quantity with sleep. Make sure you get enough sleep and track how you feel after you’ve slept. Apps such as Pillow give you information on your sleep quality and gives you tips on how to improve.

Review

Choosing to live a healthier lifestyle has many benefits, some of which are improved energy and less tiredness.

By choosing to deal with your tiredness rather than taking a quick fix pays dividends in the long run.

Key Points

  • Drink more water
  • Eat more whole foods and Omega 3 fatty acids
  • Learn when you are most likely to be tired using apps such as V-CAF
  • Get quality sleep rather than just hours

Make a Choice

If you’ve made it this far I think it’s fair to say that you are already making the choice to find out more about how you can deal with tiredness by changing your lifestyle.

Hang on in there, it can be tough; but with perseverance I’m sure you’ll make the change that you want.

Categories
Caffeine Side Effects

What Coffee Bean Producers Wont Tell You

What The Top Coffee Bean Producers Don’t Want You To Know

What you don’t know can’t hurt you…

I enjoy drinking coffee. I like the taste and it’s become a valuable tool that I use to help me focus and stay alert.

What I failed to take into consideration was that like all stimulants, there is a danger in the amounts that you consume.

No big deal, I only drink a couple of cups a day! Unfortunately caffeine is finding its way into more of the foods and drinks that we consume daily. 

What annoyed me was the lack of info regarding the cumulative effects of coffee and caffeine consumption; so I decided to write this article to help fill that void.

Fresh Coffee Beans
Photo by Alex@worthyofelegance on Unsplash

The Rising Consumption of Caffeine

Back in June 1 2013, the Washington Post published an article by Brady Dennis that brought attention to the rising amount of food and beverages that contained caffeine.
Slew of caffeinated food products has FDA jittery

Since then there are even more products on the market that contain caffeine.

  • Chocolates
  • Ice Cream and Frozen Yogurts
  • Puddings
  • Breakfast Cereals
  • Headache Pills
  • Various Medications
  • And surprisingly to me Decaffeinated Coffee (although at a reduced level – 12mg compared to 84mg in regular coffee)

I speculate that the increased use of caffeine in products that we ingest is not so much for the health benefits, but rather for its addictive traits (like sugar).

The Effects of Increased Caffeine Consumption on Your Health

There are plenty of articles on the web that suggest that going over 3 to 4 cups of coffee a day can be bad for you over time.

What are not highlighted are the cumulative effects of all the caffeine you can ingest in one day over a period of time.

Thankfully there are many research papers that find both the pros and cons for increasing your caffeine intake.

For example there was a study by G. Webster Ross, MD; Robert D. Abbott, PhD; Helen Petrovitch, MD; et al found that increasing the caffeine consumption of Japanese-American men between the ages of 45 and 68, reduced the risk of developing Parkinson disease.
Association of Coffee and Caffeine Intake With the Risk of Parkinson Disease

And here are some of the cons:

So what can we do to reduce our exposure to caffeine?

Caffeine Control Strategies

Moderation is key. To reduce our exposure to caffeine we first must take the decision to actively watch for how much we consume.

Here are some strategies that I’ve found helpful:

  • Read what’s on the label
    Although the amount of caffeine may not be on the label, if you want to reduce your consumption of caffeine err on the side of caution
  • Use alternatives
    Feeling tired; need to stay awake? Reach for an alternative to coffee (and not decaf)! Water; fruit juices; moving around; using an alarm like V-CAF that warns you when you’re feeling tired; over time these tools can help you naturally increase your energy and reduce your dependency on caffeine products
  • Become more informed about caffeine and your own body.
    By knowing the pros and cons of anything you take control over your own choices rather than defaulting to an industry’s standard for your life!

Review

These days, caffeine intoxication and addiction are real threats. The increased use of caffeine in our foods and drinks masks that we are increasing our tolerance to the stimulating effects of this psychoactive substance.

Use these strategies to help take back control:

  • Find out what you are consuming by reading the label
  • Use non intrusive alternatives such as apps like V-CAF
  • Become more informed 

Take Back Control

I decided to take back control in this area of my life and started a quest to find out more.

I’m still on that quest and hope that you also start your own. Together our collective individual actions can affect change for the better.